Tech Tips

 

Tech Tips

 

 

In this issue I've compiled some helpful tips from other sources, including other HSCA members.
   The first is from Street Thunder magazine courtesy of Mike Sellmeyer: This is a cheap, easy way to find radiator leaks. Instead of an expensive pressure tester, get a rubber ball slightly larger than the filler opening. Take your compressed air blow gun and drill a hole in the ball slightly smaller than the gun tip. Insert the blow gun tip in the ball and push the ball into the radiator fill cap opening. Cap the overflow tube and use 5 to 10 psi of pressure to pressurize the radiator and find any leaks. Do this only on a cold engine and DO NOT use over 10 psi of pressure.
  These are from the same magazine: To remove chewing gum from paint, carpet, vinyl, etc., use peanut butter. (I haven't tried this but others swear it works). To remove tree sap from paint use rubbing alcohol. To get a hard to reach nut started, use a folded napkin or paper towel between the nut and open end wrench to "jam" the nut in the wrench. That will allow you to place the wrench and nut in the hard to reach area without the nut falling out. If trying to get a bolt into a hard to reach area, use a socket and extension with a folded piece of masking tape in the socket to hold the bolt until it's started.
  The following two are from Mike Pell:
  Yearly Maintenance. Do you and your car a favor. At least once per  year, inspect every bolt and screw on your car for tightness. Look for every screw and nut you can reach, as in headlight trim rings, grills,
trim pieces, dash supports, glove box, you name it. I recently found about every screw on my grill and dashbezel were all loose! Yeeesh! How did GM get them to stay tight for 30 years? These screws/bolts/nuts will only help you prevent cracked/broken "pretty" pieces. Don't neglect the suspension bolts, enginemounts, u-joint bolts, wheel studs, gas tank straps, etc, etc, etc. These are the parts that'll ruin your day if they come out.
  Do you feel like your heater is on year 'round? Hot air blowing in on your feet as soon as the engine gets warmed up? Inspect your cowl-to-hood seal. It's an important piece. The cowl vents just in front of your windshield direct fresh air into the passenger compartment via the kick-panel vents; ideally off the windshield If you don't have a cowl seal, or it's not sealing properly, the hot engine compartment
air will go right down the cowl vents and right onto your legs.
  Lastly from me: If you've ever had a situation where your socket extension needs just a slight angle to get the socket on a bolt or nut and a universal joint extension lets the socket "flop around" too much, get some wobble extensions. They have a slight taper where the socket attaches that allows the socket to "tip" slightly on the extension. You can get a set of assorted lengths in 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2" drive at Harbor Freight all for around $10.